The 2nd Massachusetts in the Cornfield: Robert Gould Shaw’s Command Baptism by Fire

Viewers of the 1989 film “Glory” know it tells the story of the 54th Massachusetts African American regiment and its commander, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, who share a fate at the 1863 assault on Fort Wagner. Fewer know about the film’s opening scenes, which take Captain Shaw and the 2nd Massachusetts into the horror of the Cornfield. This is that story …

The 5th Virginia’s Private Ezra Stickley: Irony in the Cornfield

The 5th Virginia's Ezra Stickley awakened and realized the firing had picked up considerably. Gathering up his gear...Ezra discovered he’d misplaced the right glove of his newly-purchased pair, a loss that troubled him considerably. Within the hour Ezra would be troubled by a much greater loss...and discover the ultimate irony of Antietam's bloody Cornfield.

John Cook: An Ohio boy comes of age in Antietam’s Cornfield

John Cook swung his bugle over his shoulder and wrested from the dead man his leather pouch, bearing the undelivered shell without which the cannon was useless. From that moment on, John Cook worked a gun alongside the trained artillerymen to face down the onslaught of Wofford’s attacking Texas Brigade. It was an act that earned John Cook—who had turned fifteen years old barely a month before—the Medal of Honor.

Garland’s Brigade at the Cornfield: The Death of a Reputation…and Much More

  The 5th North Carolina’s Captain Thompson “came up to me in a very excited manner and tone cried out to me “They are flanking us! See, yonder’s a whole brigade!” I ordered him to keep silent and return to his place…but, when this act of indiscretion occurred, they began to break and run…” By … Continue reading Garland’s Brigade at the Cornfield: The Death of a Reputation…and Much More

The 88th Pennsylvania at Antietam: A Cornfield Invalid Saves Washington

Now was the moment of truth for Major George Gile and his new command, the 88th Pennsylvania. Instantly Gile’s “stentorian” voice “rang out, “88th. On first division, deploy column, march. Forward, guide centre, halt. Commence, firing!” And with that the 88th Pennsylvania entered the fight for Antietam’s Cornfield...    The 88th Pennsylvania Infantry was organized … Continue reading The 88th Pennsylvania at Antietam: A Cornfield Invalid Saves Washington

Farming the Cornfield: D. R. Miller’s 1862 Harvest of Death

With the sun glistening off rainwater on the tall, waving cornstalks this clear September morning, David Miller could have no way of knowing that soon his cornfield would become the most dangerous place to be on earth. Tuesday, September 2nd, 1862 dawned bright and clear on the rolling hills of western Maryland. David Miller was … Continue reading Farming the Cornfield: D. R. Miller’s 1862 Harvest of Death

Buffalo in the Cornfield: The 21st New York at Antietam

The 21st New York Infantry Regiment was born in Buffalo, New York’s old Court House on the evening of April 13, 1861. War fever was high that night—the day before Confederate forces had fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor—and some 102 men volunteered their services to New York State for three months. Formed into … Continue reading Buffalo in the Cornfield: The 21st New York at Antietam

Claimed by the Cornfield: Georgia’s Colonel Marcellus Douglass

With his brigade locked in a nearly point-blank fight on the southern end of Antietam’s Cornfield, Colonel Douglass had already been wounded seven times but remained in command.  Then an eighth Union Minie ball suddenly found him… Marcellus Douglass was born in Thomaston, Georgia on October 5th, 1820.  Little is known of his early years … Continue reading Claimed by the Cornfield: Georgia’s Colonel Marcellus Douglass