Garland’s Brigade at the Cornfield: The Death of a Reputation…and Much More

  The 5th North Carolina’s Captain Thompson “came up to me in a very excited manner and tone cried out to me “They are flanking us! See, yonder’s a whole brigade!” I ordered him to keep silent and return to his place…but, when this act of indiscretion occurred, they began to break and run…” By … Continue reading Garland’s Brigade at the Cornfield: The Death of a Reputation…and Much More

The 88th Pennsylvania at Antietam: A Cornfield Invalid Saves Washington

Now was the moment of truth for Major George Gile and his new command, the 88th Pennsylvania. Instantly Gile’s “stentorian” voice “rang out, “88th. On first division, deploy column, march. Forward, guide centre, halt. Commence, firing!” And with that the 88th Pennsylvania entered the fight for Antietam’s Cornfield...  By David A. Welker The 88th Pennsylvania … Continue reading The 88th Pennsylvania at Antietam: A Cornfield Invalid Saves Washington

Farming the Cornfield: D. R. Miller’s 1862 Harvest of Death

With the sun glistening off rainwater on the tall, waving cornstalks this clear September morning, David Miller could have no way of knowing that soon his cornfield would become the most dangerous place to be on earth. By David A. Welker Tuesday, September 2nd, 1862 dawned bright and clear on the rolling hills of western … Continue reading Farming the Cornfield: D. R. Miller’s 1862 Harvest of Death

Buffalo in the Cornfield: The 21st New York at Antietam

By David A. Welker The 21st New York Infantry Regiment was born in Buffalo, New York’s old Court House on the evening of April 13, 1861. War fever was high that night—the day before Confederate forces had fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor—and some 102 men volunteered their services to New York State for … Continue reading Buffalo in the Cornfield: The 21st New York at Antietam

Claimed by the Cornfield: Georgia’s Colonel Marcellus Douglass

With his brigade locked in a nearly point-blank fight on the southern end of Antietam’s Cornfield, Colonel Douglass had already been wounded seven times but remained in command.  Then an eighth Union Minie ball suddenly found him… By David A. Welker Marcellus Douglass was born in Thomaston, Georgia on October 5th, 1820.  Little is known … Continue reading Claimed by the Cornfield: Georgia’s Colonel Marcellus Douglass

Cowards in the Cornfield? (Part Two): The Complicated Story of Virginia’s General John R. Jones

When General J. R. Jones quickly relinquished command at the prospect of marching his division into Antietam’s Cornfield, his fellow Southern officers began whispering the word “coward” behind his back.  But even this firestorm of controversy couldn’t prepare Jones for what awaited him when his postwar “indiscretions” became known.    By David A. Welker John … Continue reading Cowards in the Cornfield? (Part Two): The Complicated Story of Virginia’s General John R. Jones

Cowards in the Cornfield?: The Sorry Story of Colonel William Christian

Amidst a firestorm of Confederate shells, just as his brigade was heading into the hell of Antietam’s Cornfield, Colonel William Christian suddenly muttered “I’ve always had a great fear of shelling.”  And with that, he simply vanished… By David A. Welker William Henry Christian was born on April 9th 1825 in Utica, New York.  Although … Continue reading Cowards in the Cornfield?: The Sorry Story of Colonel William Christian

The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry in the Cornfield: “Solitary and alone, we gave and took our medicine”

“For God’s sake, come and help us out…!” begged the new head of Hartsuff’s Brigade and without a pause, Colonel Lyle had the 90th Pennsylvania marching forward into the swirling inferno of Antietam’s Cornfield. By David A. Welker The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment was recruited exclusively within the city of Philadelphia. Originally designated the 2nd … Continue reading The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry in the Cornfield: “Solitary and alone, we gave and took our medicine”

The 1st Texas Infantry in the Cornfield: “Slipping the Bridle”

Barely two dozen yards ahead lay the northern end of the Cornfield.  At that moment it must have entered the minds of the men of the 1st Texas that it might just be possible to break the Yankees’ hold on this spot, if only they could reach it in time…  By David A. Welker The … Continue reading The 1st Texas Infantry in the Cornfield: “Slipping the Bridle”